The Rise of QNET and Its Drawbacks from Regulations

The internet allowed companies such as QNET to operate in a borderless manner through their ecommerce platform that seen them reach more than 100 countries. With a heart for families and communities, they provide their distributors, who are known as Independent Representatives (IR), with opportunities to become self-sufficient and raise their standards of living.

QNET’s Chairperson, Donna Imson-Lecaroz says in their “This is QNET” youtube video, “We were people on a mission. We really believed in what we had set out to do, which is that we wanted to change lives.”

In 1998, Vijay Eswaran and Joseph Bismark founded the company QNET. It has 25 offices and agency partnerships worldwide. They embrace cultural diversity as they have their leaders and employees coming from 30 different countries as they sell to customers in more than 100 countries. They’ve got 6 global logistical hubs: Netherlands, India, Malaysia, Russia, Turkey and UAE.

Joseph Bismark continues to live with the same principles that helped found QNET. He lives by the principles of Vedic and is a strong believer in positive thinking. This he learnt while practicing martial arts which he says helped him remain focused and positive. He ensures that he lives by these principles every day; understanding people, inspire people to take charge and treat everyone with respect.

QNET had been manufacturing their watches in India and wished to enlarge their operations there by producing consumer goods and electronics. Production in India would give them a cost benefit of between 8 and 12 percent said Suresh Thimiri, CEO of a QNET franchise in India. They welcomed anyone in India who had something unique to offer them, a sale platform for their product.

Despite having done well in India, 2013 had been a rough year for QNET. The pressure on making changes came from what they termed as archaic PCMCS (Banning) Act, 1978, which acted as a catalyst for a volatile market. They complained it made it difficult to differentiate genuine from fraudulent companies in the business.
Dave Osh, who was the CEO of QNET back in 2013, pointed out that India lacked guidelines for the multi-level marketing sector. In 2014, they welcomed the initiative by the government of India to amend laws governing direct selling business and called for setting up a regulator to govern the business. They pointed out fast growing economies in Malaysia, Singapore and Thailand had specific statues that regulated and facilitated direct selling.

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