The new Nature Journal is being boycotted by thousands of AI researches

It seems that the immense success and prevailing progress being made by machine learning and AI has attracted publishers who are trying to create paid subscriptions and fees to access the information. Whether it be for promotional incentive towards researchers, or financial gain directly obtained by the journal, this should have no longevity within the machine learning community One publisher by the name of Springer Nature has announced a new journal titled Nature Machine Intelligence. This publisher has already created over 50 other journals including the word nature in the title. It is clear that these organizations are trying to intercept information that is already being shared publicly, and attach a price to it. They are trying to turn something that is accessible to everyone into a paid subscription. The idea of paying for the results of studies when taxes are already being paid by the public to fund this research seems preposterous. The selling point amongst many of these concepts is that being a part of ‘brand name’ journal can help promote the research being conducted. I feel like this idea is counter-intuitive to the spreading of information and research in the field of AI. Making people pay to access something will only limit the accessibility and inherently lower the level of interest people dispose towards this field. I think moving forward with these journals and pushing them into the community would be a substantial step backward for all parties. Closed access publications should have no place within the machine learning and AI research and information community. A substantial reason why this field of research should never be a closed access market is that it is still in its infancy, and is lacking the historical traditions that other fields have established. This would only slow the rate at which this information can be retained and expanded on. Machine learning is currently growing and thriving more than ever. It is proving that it does not need these publishers in order for it to prosper, but the more the system leans towards a closed access model, the more it will start to become attached to the typical journals that control that kind of information.